History By Zim

Beyond the Textbooks

60 notes

fordlibrarymuseum:

Pieces of Silver

Betty Ford reviewed the table settings in the State Dining Room as preparations for the state dinner honoring the President of Liberia were underway.

For the centerpieces the White House borrowed 19th century silver presentation pieces from the Museum of the City of New York. These pieces, which had been given to individuals in recognition of service or accomplishment, had all be manufactured in America.

The decorations also featured arrangements of flowers and greenery that included Boston ivy, pink cabbage roses, eucalyptus, Gerber daisies, and mums. A pink lily was tucked in each napkin, which rested on the wildflower-patterned Johnson china.

(via todaysdocument)

143 notes

todaysdocument:


“…Shipping first cargo of halibut caught in Puget Sounds by crew of schooner Oscar and Hattie. September 20, 1888.” By N. B. Miller.
From the series:  Albatross Cruises from the West Indies through the Strait of Magellan then North to California and along the West Coast to Alaska, 1887 - 1893.  Records of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In 1887, the U.S. Fish Commission sent the steamer Albatross on a three-year voyage to explore fishing grounds and gather data on the commercial fishing industry in the northeastern Pacific and Bering Sea. On a stop in Tacoma, Washington, its photographer captured these proud crewmen from the Oscar and Hattie showing off their catch.
via DocsTeach

todaysdocument:

…Shipping first cargo of halibut caught in Puget Sounds by crew of schooner Oscar and Hattie. September 20, 1888.” By N. B. Miller.

From the series:  Albatross Cruises from the West Indies through the Strait of Magellan then North to California and along the West Coast to Alaska, 1887 - 1893.  Records of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In 1887, the U.S. Fish Commission sent the steamer Albatross on a three-year voyage to explore fishing grounds and gather data on the commercial fishing industry in the northeastern Pacific and Bering Sea. On a stop in Tacoma, Washington, its photographer captured these proud crewmen from the Oscar and Hattie showing off their catch.

via DocsTeach

31 notes

archivesfoundation:

As we continue to explore the Roosevelts through National Archives records this week in conjunction with Ken Burns's The Roosevelts documentary series on pbstv, today we turn our attention to Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.Eleanor Roosevelt was an active and focused First Lady, transforming the role during her 12 years in the White House. She pushed for a number of domestic and social reforms, and remained professionally active in journalism, penning a monthly column for Woman’s Home Companion magazine and Ladies Home Journal as well as a syndicated daily newspaper column called “My Day.”On March 6, 1933, Eleanor Roosevelt held the first of her 348 women’s-only press conferences. These press conferences were attended by the major female reporters of the day - including Lorena Hickok, Ruby Black, Bess Furman, May Craig, Emma Bugbee and Martha Stayer.Eleanor used these press conferences as a way to not only announce her schedule of activities but also as a platform to publicize the work of women leaders, answer her critics, and entertain questions on a variety of subjects. Topics covered everything from domestic issues like social programs, race, youth activism, etc. to international politics and the role of women in war and peace.Image of “Eleanor Roosevelt’s First Press Conference" and information via fdrlibrary.

archivesfoundation:

As we continue to explore the Roosevelts through National Archives records this week in conjunction with Ken Burns's The Roosevelts documentary series on pbstv, today we turn our attention to Anna Eleanor Roosevelt.

Eleanor Roosevelt was an active and focused First Lady, transforming the role during her 12 years in the White House. She pushed for a number of domestic and social reforms, and remained professionally active in journalism, penning a monthly column for Woman’s Home Companion magazine and Ladies Home Journal as well as a syndicated daily newspaper column called “My Day.”

On March 6, 1933, Eleanor Roosevelt held the first of her 348 women’s-only press conferences. These press conferences were attended by the major female reporters of the day - including Lorena Hickok, Ruby Black, Bess Furman, May Craig, Emma Bugbee and Martha Stayer.

Eleanor used these press conferences as a way to not only announce her schedule of activities but also as a platform to publicize the work of women leaders, answer her critics, and entertain questions on a variety of subjects. Topics covered everything from domestic issues like social programs, race, youth activism, etc. to international politics and the role of women in war and peace.

Image of “Eleanor Roosevelt’s First Press Conference" and information via fdrlibrary.

(via ourpresidents)

147 notes

todaysdocument:

fdrlibrary:

Did you know that FDR named his beloved Scottish terrier after a distant Scottish ancestor? Upon receiving the pet as a gift in 1940, Roosevelt changed the dog’s name from “Big Boy” to “Murray the Outlaw of Falahill” — “Fala” for short — in homage to the famous John Murray of Falahill.
Fala became Roosevelt’s constant companion and the most famous dog in America.   
#Scotland 

With both the Scottish Independence Referendum and The Roosevelts documentary in the news this week, here’s a little piece of Rooseveltian-Scottish trivia, courtesy of our colleagues at the fdrlibrary.

Fala Photographing the Photographers at the White House, Washington, DC, 04/07/1942

 What are you following this week, The Roosevelts, or the referendum?

todaysdocument:

fdrlibrary:

Did you know that FDR named his beloved Scottish terrier after a distant Scottish ancestor? Upon receiving the pet as a gift in 1940, Roosevelt changed the dog’s name from “Big Boy” to “Murray the Outlaw of Falahill” — “Fala” for short — in homage to the famous John Murray of Falahill.

Fala became Roosevelt’s constant companion and the most famous dog in America.  

#Scotland

With both the Scottish Independence Referendum and The Roosevelts documentary in the news this week, here’s a little piece of Rooseveltian-Scottish trivia, courtesy of our colleagues at the fdrlibrary.

Fala Photographing the Photographers at the White House, Washington, DC, 04/07/1942

What are you following this week, The Roosevelts, or the referendum?

(via ourpresidents)